SWAP MEET MAGAZINE

West Palm Beach residents want 45th Street Flea Market to close

An enforcement operation conducted by the Sacramento Valley Hi-Tech Crimes Task Force over trafficking counterfeit goods resulted in seven arrests on Sunday at the Marysville Flea Market — and two trucks filled with allegedly pirated copies of movies and music.

Local residents arrested are:

• Irasema L. Espindola, 18, of the 5000 block of Lindhurst Avenue in Linda, arrested on suspicion of fraud, counterfeit mark violation and criminal conspiracy;

• Eludim Espindola-Torres, 30, also of the 5000 block Lindhurst Avenue, arrested on suspicion of criminal conspiracy; and n Gerardo Hernandez-Reyes, 28, of the 1500 block of Upland Drive, Yuba City, arrested on suspicion of criminal conspiracy.

State and federal officers with search warrants went to San Jose and the Marysville market on Simpson Lane in Yuba County, the Sacramento County Sheriff's Department said.

The hi-tech task force seized about 50,000 counterfeit CDs, 30,000 DVDs and nearly $26,000 in cash believed to be a portion of the profits from the operation.

One man familiar with the flea market in Marysville said copies of movies were for sale there before DVDs were in stores. The copies sold for $5, said the man, who declined to give his name.

Officers were at the Marysville market from about 10 a.m.-12:30 p.m. Sunday.

More than a thousand people were attending the flea market and the event went on as scheduled. Voicemails left Monday at the office of the market were not answered.

Law enforcement agencies involved in the raid included the FBI, the Yuba County Sheriff's Department, Sacramento County Sheriff's Department and the Marysville Police Department.

- See more at: http://www.appeal-democrat.com/news/counterfeit-123565-market-marysville.html#sthash.E616GB5S.dpuf

An enforcement operation conducted by the Sacramento Valley Hi-Tech Crimes Task Force over trafficking counterfeit goods resulted in seven arrests on Sunday at the Marysville Flea Market — and two trucks filled with allegedly pirated copies of movies and music.

Local residents arrested are:

• Irasema L. Espindola, 18, of the 5000 block of Lindhurst Avenue in Linda, arrested on suspicion of fraud, counterfeit mark violation and criminal conspiracy;

• Eludim Espindola-Torres, 30, also of the 5000 block Lindhurst Avenue, arrested on suspicion of criminal conspiracy; and n Gerardo Hernandez-Reyes, 28, of the 1500 block of Upland Drive, Yuba City, arrested on suspicion of criminal conspiracy.

State and federal officers with search warrants went to San Jose and the Marysville market on Simpson Lane in Yuba County, the Sacramento County Sheriff's Department said.

The hi-tech task force seized about 50,000 counterfeit CDs, 30,000 DVDs and nearly $26,000 in cash believed to be a portion of the profits from the operation.

One man familiar with the flea market in Marysville said copies of movies were for sale there before DVDs were in stores. The copies sold for $5, said the man, who declined to give his name.

Officers were at the Marysville market from about 10 a.m.-12:30 p.m. Sunday.

More than a thousand people were attending the flea market and the event went on as scheduled. Voicemails left Monday at the office of the market were not answered.

Law enforcement agencies involved in the raid included the FBI, the Yuba County Sheriff's Department, Sacramento County Sheriff's Department and the Marysville Police Department.

- See more at: http://www.appeal-democrat.com/news/counterfeit-123565-market-marysville.html#sthash.E616GB5S.dpuf

An enforcement operation conducted by the Sacramento Valley Hi-Tech Crimes Task Force over trafficking counterfeit goods resulted in seven arrests on Sunday at the Marysville Flea Market — and two trucks filled with allegedly pirated copies of movies and music.

Local residents arrested are:

• Irasema L. Espindola, 18, of the 5000 block of Lindhurst Avenue in Linda, arrested on suspicion of fraud, counterfeit mark violation and criminal conspiracy;

• Eludim Espindola-Torres, 30, also of the 5000 block Lindhurst Avenue, arrested on suspicion of criminal conspiracy; and n Gerardo Hernandez-Reyes, 28, of the 1500 block of Upland Drive, Yuba City, arrested on suspicion of criminal conspiracy.

State and federal officers with search warrants went to San Jose and the Marysville market on Simpson Lane in Yuba County, the Sacramento County Sheriff's Department said.

The hi-tech task force seized about 50,000 counterfeit CDs, 30,000 DVDs and nearly $26,000 in cash believed to be a portion of the profits from the operation.

One man familiar with the flea market in Marysville said copies of movies were for sale there before DVDs were in stores. The copies sold for $5, said the man, who declined to give his name.

Officers were at the Marysville market from about 10 a.m.-12:30 p.m. Sunday.

More than a thousand people were attending the flea market and the event went on as scheduled. Voicemails left Monday at the office of the market were not answered.

Law enforcement agencies involved in the raid included the FBI, the Yuba County Sheriff's Department, Sacramento County Sheriff's Department and the Marysville Police Department.

- See more at: http://www.appeal-democrat.com/news/counterfeit-123565-market-marysville.html#sthash.E616GB5S.dpuf

An enforcement operation conducted by the Sacramento Valley Hi-Tech Crimes Task Force over trafficking counterfeit goods resulted in seven arrests on Sunday at the Marysville Flea Market — and two trucks filled with allegedly pirated copies of movies and music.

Local residents arrested are:

• Irasema L. Espindola, 18, of the 5000 block of Lindhurst Avenue in Linda, arrested on suspicion of fraud, counterfeit mark violation and criminal conspiracy;

• Eludim Espindola-Torres, 30, also of the 5000 block Lindhurst Avenue, arrested on suspicion of criminal conspiracy; and n Gerardo Hernandez-Reyes, 28, of the 1500 block of Upland Drive, Yuba City, arrested on suspicion of criminal conspiracy.

State and federal officers with search warrants went to San Jose and the Marysville market on Simpson Lane in Yuba County, the Sacramento County Sheriff's Department said.

The hi-tech task force seized about 50,000 counterfeit CDs, 30,000 DVDs and nearly $26,000 in cash believed to be a portion of the profits from the operation.

One man familiar with the flea market in Marysville said copies of movies were for sale there before DVDs were in stores. The copies sold for $5, said the man, who declined to give his name.

Officers were at the Marysville market from about 10 a.m.-12:30 p.m. Sunday.

More than a thousand people were attending the flea market and the event went on as scheduled. Voicemails left Monday at the office of the market were not answered.

Law enforcement agencies involved in the raid included the FBI, the Yuba County Sheriff's Department, Sacramento County Sheriff's Department and the Marysville Police Department.

- See more at: http://www.appeal-democrat.com/news/counterfeit-123565-market-marysville.html#sthash.E616GB5S.dpuf


WEST PALM BEACH, Fla. -- They've had enough and are demanding West Palm Beach take action to close down what they say is a dangerous spot.

Residents who live around the 45th Street Flea Market say they're fed up and they want Mayor Jeri Muoio to shut it down.

They point to a list of problems at the flea market as proof the market needs to go.

There have been at least three reported shootings on the property since August. All totaled, police have responded to 423 calls since January, 2013.

That’s why residents met with Muoio Monday afternoon.

The room was packed, which demonstrates how big of a deal this situation has become when people leave work to attend such a public meeting.

Last month, the flea market owners blamed the problems at their facility - crime, drugs, etc. – on to the surrounding neighborhood.

The residents responded by saying, “think again.”

“It’s not that it’s gotten out of hand,” said Jacqueline Smith, President of Concerned Residents of Westfield Association. “It was out of hand when it opened…from the very beginning.”

Smith moved to the Westfield neighborhood in West Palm Beach in 1981. She says the area is full of professional, middle class families that have seen crime increase dramatically since the 45th Street Flea Market opened its doors.

“It was the city's actions that caused that building to be the kind of building that, that kind of use could only happen,” said Smith, referring to crime taking place at the market.

Smith says the original plan for the area was for a grocery store and medical offices to move in.

Instead, residents say businesses that attract the wrong crowd is what led to problems.

Mayor Muoio says the city has to follow a legal process.

For starters, it’s demanding that the flea market owners develop a plan to transform their property into a place where families feel secure.


“Right now, they are a chronic nuisance,” said Muoio. “There's a list of things they have to do, and we'll see if they do it.”

But most residents want the flea market to be designated a complete public nuisance.

That would give the city the legal means to shut it down once and for all.

“I have seen real drug deals go down right in front of my eyes,” recalls Virginia Grant, President of the Eco Lakes Association of Neighbors.

She wants to see the flea market completely turned around and made into a medical complex.

“Just the visual blight brings on disrespect to that particular area,” said Grant. “Especially criminals; in their mind, ‘oh this is an area that nobody cares about it’.”

So what happens next?

That action plan being developed by the flea market owners will go back and forth between them and the city over the next 30 - 45 days.

In the meantime, there's heavy code enforcement taking place; businesses are being inspected for tax compliance; and police are making sure public safety and security is being followed.

Read more here: http://www.modbee.com/2013/09/25/2940685/fire-breaks-out-at-ceres-flea.html#storylink=cpy

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Homeland security offers warnings to

flea market shoppers

It's alarming what's being sold at flea markets, and Homeland security investigators warn your health could be at risk from some of it.

Some of the ingredients in counterfeit beauty products are not only toxic, but downright disgusting.

Just a reminder that getting that great find at the flea market may end up costing you in the long run.

"We'll find them at flea markets; we'll also find them in commercial loads being imported into the U.S. through commercial ports of entry," said Homeland Security Deputy Special Agent Mark Dawson.

Dawson says there's a rise in counterfeit beauty products being sold at flea markets and although they come at a better price than if you buy the real thing from a reputable seller, they can cost the consumer their health.

"Some cosmetics have aluminum or carcinogens, such as arsenic, in the ingredients themselves," Dawson said.

And many of them come in the same packaging as the high-end makeup sold at stores, in efforts to fool consumers.

Thinking of buying that perfume at a discounted price? You might want to think again.

"They found fragrances that have had urine or other things that caused such a bad reaction to the skin that the consumer is never able to wear a fragrance again," Dawson said.

According to Dawson, 85 percent of the counterfeit merchandise is made in China, and shipped through Mexico.

"The people selling these items at the flea markets aren't manufacturing these items.They buy them at a low price then turn around and sell them at a mark up and make a profit," Dawson said.

And fake beauty products aren't the only hazard out there.

Consumers are snatching up $200 headphones for a fraction of the price. But the problem is that they could end up not being able to hear music properly again.

"They did not have the circuitry in the headphones that regulates the base input and it could actually cause permanent hearing damage," Dawson said.

Some things to look for: misspellings on labels, and logos that just don't look right.

You probably already know--if it's priced lower than the real thing, it isn't the real thing.


Read more here: http://www.charlotteobserver.com/2013/02/27/3881396/brothers-charged-in-robberies.html#storylink=cpy

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